Tag Archives: Keith Ecker

Guts & Glory

Storytelling that is free, badass, true-to-life, and still somehow manages to benefit puppies and kids, at PAWS Chicago and 826CHI, respectively. Billed as “Live Lit for the Lionhearted,” the series promises to “strike at the heart of the human condition through story.” Hosted by Bitches Gotta Eat blogger Samantha Irby and Essay Fiesta founder Keith Ecker. Schubas | 3159 N Southport Ave | FREE | 21+ | 7pm every third Wednesday of the month | Website

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Guts & Glory: An Intro to Live Lit
by Julia Fine

Sam and Keith

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAMANTHA IRBY AND KEITH ECKER

On Wednesday night, between raucous mid-June thunderstorms, I ventured to Schuba’s Tavern for Guts & Glory, my first Live Lit experience. Now, I know that I am way late to the club—Guts & Glory’s Facebook page has over 800 followers, and when I spoke with co-founder Keith Ecker, he marveled at how quickly this Chicago community has grown. Two years ago, Guts & Glory was just a gleam in Ecker and co-founder Samantha Irby’s eyes—now, the June Edition is filling the upstairs room at Schuba’s (a room I’d like to dub the SXSW Roundup Room, given the impressive collection of said posters on its walls), and they’ll be celebrating a two-year anniversary in September. Continue reading

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Performing Stories, Rather Than Just Reading Them
by Alba Machado

Page and StageA lot of people who know how to write a good story don’t know how to tell a good story. If you are Toni Morrison or José Saramago, then sure, there’s a good chance your audience will hang on your every word no matter how lifeless your delivery may be, its adoration assured by your tremendous body of Nobel prize-winning work. But if you are a relatively unknown writer taking to the stage in search of a wider readership, your words alone will not be enough. Minds will wander. Smiles will be empty. Applause will be merely polite. After all, when you are reading to an audience that is physically present, you are reading with your entire body—your posture, movement, gesture, facial expression, eye contact, tone of voice, inflection—and if you are just standing there and dictating lines from a page, then on some level you are conveying boredom and lack of conviction. You are saying, “I don’t care about this. Maybe you shouldn’t care, either.”

This Sunday, June 8th, at the 30th annual Printers Row Lit Fest, you can walk from one tent where an author is reading to another tent where an author is performing and you can easily gauge each audience’s level of engagement. There’s no contest. At the former, there is silence and stillness, maybe an occasional nod. At the latter, there is gasping and laughter, cheering and chills. And at the RedEye tent, you can start to discover why. That’s where The Encyclopedia Show’s Robbie Telfer, Story Club’s Dana Norris, and Guts & Glory’s Keith Ecker are talking to RedEye, Metromix, and WGN Radio’s Amy Guth in a panel discussion entitled “Page Meets Stage: How to Use Performance to Enhance Your Writing Career.”

“People who are at live lit are not there to see a specific writer,” says Telfer. “They’re not Joyce Carol Oates-ing it.”

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A Year of Essay Fiesta
by Alba Machado

A staple of any good literary community is the reading series. If, as Tim Yelvington-Jones has suggested, “writers should be rock stars,” then the reading series is an opportunity for them to rock out, connect with readers, and celebrate the written–and spoken–word.

Luckily, there is no shortage of excellent reading series in Chicago. From simple and straightforward, author-with-book-in-hand readings to feisty debates and whimsical performances, there’s something for everyone who’s interested in expanding the literary experience beyond the book or screen.

Essay Fiesta is as good a place to start as any other. Bringing together some of Chicago’s top artistic talent, including comedians, playwrights, authors, and journalists, Essay Fiesta began at a dinner party when comedians Alyson Lyon and Keith Ecker decided that “Chicago needed a storytelling series that provided a platform for a cross-discipline of artists to share funny, poignant and thought-provoking stories from their lives.” It’s one of the Book Cellar’s most popular events, and although it’s free, it uses a raffle to raise money for the Howard Brown Health Center, a citywide community health organization that focuses on the GLBT community. In honor of the one-year anniversary that Essay Fiesta will be celebrating on November 15th, one of its co-founders, Keith Ecker, took time out of his busy life as comedian, theater critic, and freelance writer to answer some of Literary Chicago’s questions.

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